Wednesday, 10 April 2019

George Green Medal 2019

ITeCons, Coimbra, Portugal – 2nd July 2019

George Green Medal
The George Green Medal 2019 will be presented on the occasion of the 42nd International Conference on Boundary Elements and other Mesh Reduction Methods (BEM/MRM 42). The ceremony will take place during a special session on Tuesday 2nd July, followed by a keynote address from the medal recipient.

The George Green Medal was established by the University of Mississippi at Oxford, Mississippi, USA, and the Wessex Institute and is supported by Elsevier. It is in honour of the man who single-handedly set up the basis for the modern Boundary Element Method, among other notable achievements.
The Medal is awarded to those scientists who have carried out original work with practical applications in the field of Boundary Elements and other Mesh Reduction Methods, continuing in this manner to further develop the pioneering ideas of George Green. They are also persons of the highest integrity who, by sharing their knowledge, have helped to establish research groups all around the world. The Medal is given once a year and is presented during the BEM/MRM Conference.

Professor Zhenhan Yao

Prof Yao Zhenhan
The recipient of the 2019 Medal will be Professor Zhenhan Yao, Director of the Institute of Solid Mechanics at Tsinghua University in Beijing until his retirement in 2003.
Professor Yao graduated from Tsinghua University in Solid Mechanics in 1966 and became a lecturer at that institution. In 1986 he received the degree Dr.-Ing. from Ruhr University Bochum, Germany. In 1989 he was promoted to full professor. His research interests are in computational solid mechanics, especially boundary element methods, which he has studied for 40 years and obtained a series of achievements, from the theory of conventional BEM to the fast multipole BEM and boundary-type meshless method. In recent years, by reflecting on why BEM has been gradually marginalised in engineering applications, he presented a new High-Accuracy BEM and High-Performance BEM. He has taken the local stress analysis of the real beam, plate and shell structure as the breakthrough point to continue to give play to its advantages. He has made a relentless effort to make BEM an indispensable supplement to the FEM.
He has supervised 35 PhD and 20 MSc degrees and has over 300 publications in journals and proceedings of national and international conferences. He has published a book on BEM and FM-BEM in Chinese. He has chaired the China National Conference on Boundary Elements in Engineering many times and is one of the founders of the Asia-Pacific International Conference on Computational Methods in Engineering (ICOME). He is an Associate Editor of the International Journal on Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements (EABE).

Keynote Presentation

“Basic ideas and research progress of a new High-Accuracy and High-Performance Boundary Element Method”
Zhenhan Yao, School of Aerospace Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China
Abstract
The accuracy verification of BEM often depends on comparing BEM results with those obtained from the respective FEM solution. As a consequence, the engineering community may take the view that since the results obtained by the BEM are consistent with those obtained by the FEM, it is more convenient to apply the widely used FEM.

In view of the above problem, the basic idea of error analysis for numerical simulation of practical engineering problems was introduced, abandoning the dependence on FEM for accuracy verification. Based on Rizzo type boundary integral equation, a new High-Accuracy BEM (HABEM) was proposed for the elastic static problem. In HABEM, the accuracy verification is reduced to the effective control of the calculation error (mainly the integration error) and the discretization error. Taking the bending of a cantilever thin-plate beam under generalized plane stress as benchmark problem, the advantages of the BEM in reducing dimension and high precision have been shown and then, taking the 3D analysis of the same problem as a benchmark problem, a HABEM for 3D analysis has been established. In addition to the elasticity problems, the extension of this approach to other problems such as acoustic problems has been tried.

On this basis, a fast algorithm was further introduced and the additional errors of the fast algorithm and the iterative solver of linear algebraic equations were controlled to develop the High-Performance BEM (HPBEM). For some simple problems, it could be seen that introducing the ACA fast algorithm and iterative solver GMRES has greatly improved the computational efficiency and expanded the solution scale. However, the iterative solution is difficult to converge for the thin cantilever square plate and slender cantilever beam. This key problem in the development of HPBEM is solved by observing that, for the slender beam and thin plate without local stress concentration, the discretization error can be controlled satisfactorily by subdividing a few elements, provided enough high-order elements are used. However, if lower-order elements are used, many more elements should be subdivided.

Previous Laureates

Details of the previous George Green Medal presentations can be found in the conference reports listed below:

George Green (1793-1841)

George Green Portrait Photo
George Green was a self-taught genius who mysteriously delivered one of the most influential mathematics and physics works of all time. He educated himself in mathematics and self-published the work “An Essay on the Application of Mathematical Analysis to the Theories of Electricity and Magnetism”. In his very first article he derived the Green’s first, second and third identities, forged the concept of Green’s function, and solved the problem of electrical potential created by a single charge placed inside a spherical metal shell. The ideas of Green’s function forever changed the landscape of science, as many physics and mathematics problems have been solved using this technique. As Green died early, and his work was discovered only posthumously, it remains a mystery today how Green could produce such a masterpiece without the guidance of a great teacher or school and, in fact, without a formal education. Only recently, due to the advent of powerful computers, has it been possible to take full advantage of Green’s pioneering developments.

For further information about the George Green Medal please contact:
George Green Medal
Wessex Institute
Ashurst Lodge, Ashurst
Southampton
SO40 7AA, UK
Tel: +44 (0) 238 029 3223
Email: wit@wessex.ac.uk

Friday, 4 January 2019

A message from our Chief Academic Officer

SantiagoHernandez2019 promises to be another busy year for the Wessex Institute and its conference division in particular. The Institute has organised 20 international conferences for 2019 in a variety of disciplines. This demonstrates the broad range of scientific interests of our institution, which has always sought to be engaged in the relevant challenges of our times. All our meetings are supported by renowned academics as part of the International Scientific Advisory Committee (ISAC), which guarantees the scientific relevance of each conference. In addition, each meeting has an assigned conference coordinator who ensures the smooth running of the entire event.

Papers submitted to WIT conferences are always peer-reviewed and those accepted are published in the WIT Transactions which are indexed in Scopus. The Institute is also involved in the publication of a number of international scientific journals to which conference delegates are invited to submit an enhanced version of their conference paper, thereby increasing the opportunity for the dissemination of their research.

WIT meetings have a time honoured tradition of being exceptional occasions for the presentation of new ideas, communicating with colleagues and for the interchange of initiatives. Each conference is attended and chaired by a senior WIT Board member who would welcome the opportunity to discuss ideas for various types of academic collaboration, including the organisation of short courses at WIT, new conferences or joint research projects.

The Institute is located in the beautiful New Forest countryside, near Southampton, and due to its outstanding facilities, it makes a very appropriate location for senior researchers to spend part of their sabbatical leave or for graduate students who wish to spend some months abroad during their PhD years.

We would like to encourage you to attend our conferences, to find out more about WIT’s activities and to discuss any initiatives you may have in mind for collaborative projects.

My very best regards

Santiago Hernandez
Chief Academic Officer

Friday, 14 September 2018

George Green Medal 2018 Ceremony

The New Forest, UK – 11 September 2018

green medal frontThe George Green Medal 2018 was presented on the occasion of the 41st International Conference on Boundary Elements and other Mesh Reduction Methods (BEM/MRM 41). The ceremony took place during a special session on Tuesday 11th September, followed by a keynote address from the medal recipient.

The George Green Medal was established by the University of Mississippi at Oxford, Mississippi, USA, and the Wessex Institute and is supported by Elsevier. It is in honour of the man who single-handedly set up the basis for the modern Boundary Element Method, among other notable achievements.

The Medal is awarded to those scientists who have carried out original work with practical applications in the field of Boundary Elements and other Mesh Reduction Methods, continuing in this manner to further develop the pioneering ideas of George Green. They are also persons of the highest integrity who, by sharing their knowledge, have helped to establish research groups all around the world. The Medal is given once a year and is presented during the BEM/MRM Conference.

George Green Portrait Photo
George Green (1793-1841)
George Green was a self-taught genius who mysteriously delivered one of the most influential mathematics and physics works of all time. He educated himself in mathematics and self-published the work “An Essay on the Application of Mathematical Analysis to the Theories of Electricity and Magnetism”. In his very first article he derived the Green’s first, second and third identities, forged the concept of Green’s function, and solved the problem of electrical potential created by a single charge placed inside a spherical metal shell. The ideas of Green’s function forever changed the landscape of science, as many physics and mathematics problems have been solved using this technique. As Green died early, and his work was discovered only posthumously, it remains a mystery today how Green could produce such a masterpiece without the guidance of a great teacher or school and, in fact, without a formal education. Only recently, due to the advent of powerful computers, has it been possible to take full advantage of Green’s pioneering developments.


Prof Ney Augusto Dumont
Prof Ney Augusto Dumont

The recipient of the 2018 Medal was Prof Ney Augusto Dumont, Professor and Head of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), Brazil.

Ney received his BS degree in Civil Engineering at the Federal University of Bahia, Brazil, in 1972, and the MS and Dr.-Ing. degrees in Structural Engineering at PUC-Rio, in 1973, and at the Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany, in 1978, respectively.

His research interests are in computational mechanics, variational methods, hybrid methods, FEM, BEM, fracture mechanics, time-dependent problems, gradient elasticity and numerical integration methods.

Ney has supervised 60 MS and PhD works. He also has over 150 publications in international journals, conference proceedings, and book chapters. He is Fellow of Wessex Institute, UK, Member of the Board of Principal Editors of WIT Transactions and Associate Editor of EABE – International Journal on Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements.

Keynote Presentation:

“CONCEPTUAL REVIEW OF VARIATIONALLY-BASED HYBRID BOUNDARY ELEMENT METHODS”

The presentation will discuss the hybrid boundary element method (HBEM) which was introduced in 1987 on the basis of the Hellinger-Reissner potential, as a generalization of Pian’s hybrid finite element method. This new two-field formulation makes use of the same fundamental solutions of the collocation boundary element method (CBEM) to interpolate the stress field in the domain of an elastic body, which ends up discretized as a super element with arbitrary shape and arbitrary number of degrees of freedom located along the boundary. Shortly thereafter, a variational counterpart – called hybrid displacement boundary element method (HDBEM) – was proposed by Brebbia and Figueiredo on the basis of the Hu potential and making use of three field functions, with equivalent advantages and disadvantages when compared to the CBEM. The present paper discusses these methods as well as the traditional CBEM. The mathematical and mechanical properties of the resulting matrix equations are investigated and a series of concepts in both HDBEM and CBEM that have not been properly considered by previous authors – particularly concerning convergence issues – are redefined. This review paper does not include a thorough literature survey. It rather completes and extends a paper published by the author in 2003 and carries out a theoretical, comparative analysis of the three methods, with many physical considerations, some recently added conceptual features and a few academic illustrations.

For further information about the George Green Medal, please contact us at the Wessex Institute:

George Green Medal
Wessex Institute
Ashurst Lodge, Ashurst
Southampton
SO40 7AA, UK
Tel: +44 (0) 238 029 3223
Fax: +44 (0) 238 029 2853
Email: wit@wessex.ac.uk

See the following conference web pages for details this and the previous George Green Medal presentations:

Friday, 7 September 2018

Prigogine Award 2018 Ceremony

The 2018 Prigogine Gold Medal was awarded to Professor Stuart Kauffman, University of Pennsylvania, USA.

The Prigogine Gold Medal 2018 Award Ceremony took place at the University of Siena on Tuesday 4th September 2018, during the first day of the 10th International Conference on Sustainable Development and Planning (SDP).

The Prigogine Medal was established by the University of Siena and the Wessex Institute of Technology in 2004 to honour the memory of Professor Ilya Prigogine, Nobel Prize Winner for Chemistry.

ILYA PRIGOGINE
Ilya Prigogine was born in Moscow in 1917, and obtained his undergraduate and graduate education in chemistry at the Free University in Brussels. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for his contribution to non-equilibrium thermodynamics, particularly the theory of dissipative structures. The main theme of his scientific work was the role of time in the physical sciences and biology. He contributed significantly to the understanding of irreversible processes, particularly in systems far from equilibrium. The results of his work have had profound consequences for understanding biological and ecological systems.
Prigogine’s ideas established the basis for ecological systems research. The Prigogine Medal to honour his memory is awarded annually to a leading scientist in the field of ecological systems. All recipients have been deeply influenced by the work of Prigogine.

Previous Prigogine Laureates:
2004 Sven Jorgensen, Denmark
2005 Enzo Tiezzi, Italy
2006 Bernard Patten, USA
2007 Robert Ulanowicz, USA
2008 Ioannis Antoniou, Greece
2009 Emilio del Giudice, Italy
2010 Felix Müller, Germany
2011 Larissa Brizhik, Ukraine
2012 Gerald Pollack, USA
2013 Vladimir Voeikov, Russia
2014 Mae-wan Ho, UK
2015 Bai-Lian Larry Li, USA
2016 Brian Fath, USA
2017 João Carlos Marques, Portugal

The 2018 Medal was awarded to Professor Stuart Kauffman, Emeritus Professor of Biochemistry at the University of Pennsylvania and affiliate faculty at the Institute for Systems Biology.

STUART KAUFFMANStuart Kauffman
Professor Stuart Kauffman is an American medical doctor, theoretical biologist, and complex systems researcher who studies the origin of life on Earth. He was a professor the Universities of Chicago, Pennsylvania and Calgary. He is currently Emeritus Professor of Biochemistry at the University of Pennsylvania and affiliate faculty at the Institute for Systems Biology. He has a number of awards including a MacArthur Fellowship and a Wiener Medal.

He is best known for arguing that the complexity of biological systems and organisms might result as much from self-organisation and far-from-equilibrium dynamics as from Darwinian natural selection as discussed in his book Origins of Order (1993). In 1967 and 1969 Kauffman used random boolean networks to investigate generic self-organising properties of gene regulatory networks. Using these models, he proposed that cell types are dynamical attractors in gene regulatory networks and that cell differentiation can be understood as transitions between attractors. Recent evidence suggests that cell types in humans and other organisms are attractors. In 1971 he suggested that a zygote may not be able to access all the cell type attractors in its gene regulatory network during development and that some of the developmentally inaccessible cell types might be cancer cell types. This suggested the possibility of "cancer differentiation therapy". He also proposed the self-organised emergence of collectively autocatalytic sets of polymers, specifically peptides, for the origin of molecular reproduction, which have found experimental support.

SPECIAL PRIGOGINE LECTURE
on
A World Beyond Physics: The Emergence and Evolution of Life
delivered by Professor Stuart Kauffman at the University of Siena, Italy, Spain

The emergence and evolution of life is based on physics but is beyond physics. Evolution is an historical process arising from the non-ergodicity of the universe above the level of atoms. Most complex things will never exist. Human hearts exist. Prebiotic chemistry saw the evolution of many organic molecules in complex reaction networks, and the formation of low energy structures such as membranes. Theory and experiments suggest that from this, the spontaneous emergence of self reproducing molecular systems could arise and evolve. Such “collectively autocatalytic systems” cyclically link non-equilibrium processes whose constrained release of energy constitutes “work” to construct the same constraints on those non-equilibrium processes. Cells yoke a set of non-equilibrium processes and constraints on the energy released as work to build their own constraints and reproduce.

Such systems are living, and can propagate their organization with heritable variations, so can be subject to natural selection. In this evolution, these proto-organisms emerge unprestatably, and afford novel niches enabling, not causing, further types of proto-organisms to emerge. With this, unprestatable new functions arise. The ever-changing phase space of evolution includes these functionalities. Since we cannot prestate these ever new functionalities, we can write no laws of motion for this evolution, which is therefor entailed by no laws at all, and thus not reducible to physics. Beyond entailing law, the evolving biosphere literally constructs itself and is the most complex system we know in the universe.

For further information about the Prigogine Awards, please contact:

Wessex Institute of Technology
Ashurst Lodge, Ashurst
Southampton
SO40 7AA, UK
Tel: +44 (0) 238 029 3223
Fax: +44 (0) 238 029 2853
Email: wit@wessex.ac.uk

See the following Web pages for details of recent Prigogine Awards:
Further details of all Prigogine Awards can be found on our dedicated page: Prigogine Award

Wednesday, 1 August 2018

New Series Editor: "Innovation and Discovery in Russian Science and Engineering"

Professor Stavros Syngellakis, Adjunct Professor of the Wessex Institute, has been appointed as Joint Series Editor of the book series “Innovation and Discovery in Russian Science and Engineering”, published by Springer. He joins Professor Jerry Connor of MIT, USA, in this role.StavrosSyngellakis
Prof Syngellakis brings to this position a wealth of experience as an Editor, not only of two of the books in this Series but also of other books and several journals of which he is Editor-in-Chief and a member of the Editorial Boards. In addition, he reviewed many of the proposals for the Series.
Professor Carlos Brebbia established the Series in collaboration with the Ural Federal University (URFU) in Russia. It currently has seven books listed, six of which have already been published, and the seventh is due to appear shortly. The Wessex Institute is eager to pursue and develop this project, following its successful launch and using the considerable contacts and material Prof Brebbia gathered before he left us.
The Wessex Institute has a formal agreement with URFU and this is one of a number of collaborative projects, including conferences and journal publication, that the two institutions have undertaken.

Tuesday, 24 July 2018

New Chief Academic Officer: Professor Santiago Hernandez

SantiagoHernandez
We are pleased to advise that Professor Santiago Hernandez has recently joined us at WIT, as Chief Academic Officer on a part-time basis. He brings a wealth of experience and knowledge to this position and is a most welcome addition to our senior staff.
Santiago is Full Professor of Structural Engineering at the University of Coruna (Spain). He has extensive experience in structural analysis and design in several fields, ranging from long-span bridges to historical buildings and aircraft. He is well known for his expertise in aeroelasticity and for the application of numerical optimization techniques to engineering design. He is an ASCE and IABSE Fellow, an Associate Fellow of AIAA and also possesses the Eminent Scientist Medal from WIT. He has participated in a large number of research projects at national and international level.
Santiago has been involved with WIT for many years, collaborating in the organisation of short courses and conferences. He was appointed to WIT’s Board of Directors in 1991 and has been involved in shaping the strategy of the Institute since that time.
He has almost three hundred scientific publications, has authored several books and edited books written by leading scientists.

Monday, 4 June 2018

Carlos A. Brebbia Memorial

Carlos ObituaryA celebration of the life of Professor Carlos A. Brebbia was held in the grounds of Ashurst Lodge, on Saturday 19th May 2018. A group of 160 people gathered from many countries, including the USA, Russia, Macedonia, Ukraine, Spain, Belgium, Italy and many from around the UK.

The proceedings began with an opening tribute from Alexander Brebbia, son of Carlos, who spoke of his father’s many achievements and strength of character, illustrating his points by way of several delightful and touching anecdotes about Carlos and their relationship through the years. This was followed by a thorough and interesting account of Carlos’ life and career, given by his oldest friend and colleague, Professor Jerry Connor of MIT in the USA.

AlexBrebbia Speech
JerryConnor Speech
Alex Brebbia
Wessex Institute, UK

Jerry Connor
MIT, USA

Marque

After breaking for lunch, a programme of shorter, heartfelt and moving tributes began, given by many friends, colleagues and old-WITonians, including:
StavrosSyngellakis Speech

BobAdey Speech

Prof Stavros Syngellakis
Wessex Institute, UK,
Board Member
Dr Bob Adey
BEASY, UK
JuanCasaresLong Speech
PatrickDeWilde Speech
Prof Juan Casares Long
University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain,  WIT Board Member
Prof Patrick De Wilde,
Free University of Brussels, Belgium, WIT Board Member
TarasFilatov Speech
MarkHadfield Speech
Dr Taras Filatov
Old WITonian (Ukraine)
Prof Mark Hadfield
University of Bournemouth, UK
SantiagoHernandez Speech
AlainKassab Speech
Prof Santiago Hernandez
University of Coruna, Spain
WIT Board Member
Prof Alain Kassab,
University of Central Florida, USA
MikhailKozhevnikov Speech
JulianLewis Speech
Prof Mikhail Kozhevnikov,
Ural Federal University, Russia
Dr Julian Lewis,
MP, UK
Fernando Mengo Speech
Derek Northwood Speech
Capt Fernando Mengo,
Defence Attaché, Argentine Embassy, London, UK
Prof Derek Northwood,
University of Windsor, Canada
Giorgio Passerini Speech
Alex Rabasa Speech
Prof Giorgio Passerini
University of La Marche, Italy,
WIT Board Member
Prof Alex Rabasa,
University Miguel Hernandez of Elche, Spain
Jon Trevelyan Speech
Peter Vorobieff Speech
Prof Jon Trevelyn
Durham University, UK
Prof Peter Vorobieff
University of New Mexico, USA


The occasion was a fitting celebration of Carlos’ life and all that he achieved. It was touching to hear so many of his friends and colleagues expressing their admiration of him and his work, as well as their commitment to continuing his legacy. We are grateful to all who attended and contributed to making this a very special event.

Please see the Carlos Brebbia Obituary page for further information about his life and achievements.


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